Jean Royere

Jean Royère pioneered an original style that incorporates bright colors, natural forms, and precious materials in a wide range of creative achievements. Considering ephemeral ornamentation and subject to fashion winds, Royère concentrated on form and volume, creating pieces of fabric, metal, and wood that carved space or filled the air with their great shapes and lines.

Bio

Jean Royère was known for his colorful, soft, and playful furniture as a French interior designer. Born in Paris, France in 1902 into a wealthy family, he initially worked as a banker before leaving for an apprenticeship with Pierre Gouff in 1931, under whom he studied the meticulous cabinetmaking skills. In 1934, Royère won a prestigious competition to design the restaurant of the lavish Carlton Hotel on the Champs-Élysées, earning widespread acclaim and immediately beginning his career. He formed his own company in 1944. He started building an international clientele, opening offices in Cairo, Beirut, Tehran, and São Paulo, with prominent clients including King Farouk, Jordan’s King Hussein, and Iran’s Shah. He died just one year after settling there in New York, in 1981. In 1999, the Museum of Decorative Arts in Paris held a museum exhibition of his art, and in 2008 at the Sonnabend Gallery in New York, he was the subject of a significant posthumous retrospective.

Style

Royère has pioneered an original style that incorporates bright colors, natural forms, and precious materials in a wide range of creative achievements. Favoring jewel tones, richly polished wood, and curved vegetable shapes, Royère created vibrant spaces that foster movement and interaction; suitable for sophisticated entertainment and recreation settings. Although he declared himself “against furniture,” Royère created influential pieces that gained attention in the decades that followed. Considering ephemeral ornamentation and subject to fashion winds, Royère concentrated on form and volume, creating pieces of fabric, metal, and wood that carved space or filled the air with their great shapes and lines.

Masterpieces

His Tour Eiffel lamps and tables display his signature Croisillon pattern’s straight geometric lines in dark brass punctuated with colored spheres. His sinuous Corbeille lights are reminiscent of the charm of traditional chandeliers and sconces, but with modern style boldness.